Why I don’t want another year of university

So I’ve been posting about my worries of completing a masters, and even rejoicing over the idea of doing a part-time or distance learning masters. Those options let me complete the masters whilst working full time, which to other people sounds like hell on earth. So why don’t I want to just do one extra year of university?

The cost

A postgraduate degree will cost me way more unless I do an integrated masters, which never looked all that appealing as personally, it seems like rather generic course modules as opposed to the standard ultra-focused masters that lets me hone in on one of my loved topics.
I can get a masters loan, but the loan will have to go to both my tuition and living, and most course fees I saw would mean I would need to fully fund the living costs, which for an average UK student is about £7000, which I sadly do not have to hand. My other option for a full-time masters would be to return to university after a few years of working, and at that point I doubt I would ever get round to going back to university.
Doing a part-time degree splits the tuition fee across three years and is still the same amount as the loan, so with the full time job letting me afford to live normally, it’s the only method of affording a masters at this point in my life.

The living experience

I am aware that I will never get an experience like university again and that I haven’t spent nearly enough time enjoying the atmosphere and have instead focused on work experience and saving what I can. The extra year of masters would give me more time before entering the adult world of work and more opportunity to finally take a month long holiday, unlike after when that would involve using up most of the holiday allowance I have. This to me isn’t as big a factor, as education has been burning me out since 17, and this year during my placement has been one of my most sociable since starting university. It gave me a better schedule, a better ability to organise dates with friends, and gave me more disposable income to even travel to Iceland, a long-held dream of mine.

Losing momentum

This is the biggest one for me by a mile. It’s not just the fact I have friends already graduating and moving on with the careers, but since I turned 18, every year had felt like a step forward. I have gone from uni halls, to paying my own bills, to this year of working full time. Another two years of uni just seems like a standstill and I don’t like the feeling of not moving forward. I am eager to complete a masters and need to do so to become a chartered engineer, and the options I have now chosen to pursue don’t slow the journey towards that at all. Actually I’ll have three years of work experience and masters, as opposed to a full-time masters and two years of experience, and that makes this all the more appealing. I also study a lot better when I also have a job as I get to keep up the productivity mind-set throughout the day.

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